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Essential Standards represent the minimum a student must learn to reach high levels of learning in a course of study.  Essential Standards do not represent all that a student will learn.
 
Standard Number Standard Learning Target
CC.8.EE.5 Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations. Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways. For example, compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two moving objects has greater speed. I can graph proportional relationships.
CC.8.EE.5   I can determine the slope of a proportional relationship and explain how it is related to the unit rate.
CC.8.EE.5   I can compare proportional relationships represented in different forms, such as graphs, tables, and equations.
CC.8.EE.6 Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations. Use similar triangles to explain why the slope m is the same between any two distinct points on a non-vertical line in the coordinate plane; derive the equation y =mx for a line through the origin and the equation y = mx + b for a line intercepting the vertical axis at b. I can use similar triangles as a way to explain why the slope of a nonvertical line never changes.
CC.8.EE.7 Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations. Solve linear equations in one variable. I can solve linear equations with one variable using inverse operations.
CC.8.F.3 Define, evaluate, and compare functions. Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line; give examples of functions that are not linear. For example, the function A = s^2 giving the area of a square as a function of its side length is not linear because its graph contains the points (1,1), (2,4) and (3,9), which are not on a straight line. I can explain how the equation, y = mx + b, represents a linear function.
CC.8.G.1 Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software. Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: I can demonstrate that I understand what translation means.
CC.8.G.1   I can demonstrate that I understand what rotation means.
CC.8.G.1   I can demonstrate that I understand what reflection means.
CC.8.G.5 Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software. Use informal arguments to establish facts about the angle sum and exterior angle of triangles, about the angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal, and the angle-angle criterion for similarity of triangles. For example, arrange three copies of the same triangle so that the sum of the three angles appears to form a line, and give an argument in terms of transversals why this is so. I am able to use prior knowledge of angles, angle measurement, and mathematical reasoning to informally present facts about angles of triangles.
CC.8.G.9 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones and spheres. Know the formulas for the volume of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. I can work with the following: cone; cylinder; sphere; radius; diameter; circumference; and pi.
CC.8.SP.1 Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data. Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association. I can construct and interpret scatter plots.