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Essential Standards represent the minimum a student must learn to reach high levels of learning in a course of study.  Essential Standards do not represent all that a student will learn.

Standard Number Standard Learning Target
CC.7.G.2 Draw, construct, and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them. Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle. I can identify special triangles given various conditions of angle measures and side lengths.
CC.7.G.4 Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume. Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle. I can recite the formula for the area of a circle.
CC.7.G.4   I can recite the formula for the circumference of a circle.
CC.7.G.5 Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume. Use facts about supplementary, complementary, vertical, and adjacent angles in a multi-step problem to write and solve simple equations for an unknown angle in a figure. I can define and/or explain the angle relationships of supplementary and complementary.
CC.7.NS.1 Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. Apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram. I can add rational numbers.
CC.7.NS.1   I can subtract rational numbers.
CC.7.NS.1   I can multiply rational numbers.
CC.7.NS.1   I can divide rational numbers.
CC.7.NS.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. I can demonstrate that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0.
CC.7.NS.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts. I can change subtraction of rational numbers to adding the additive inverse.
CC.7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are integers then –(p/q) = (–p)/q = p/(–q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. I can show that integers can be divided and the quotient is a rational number.
CC.7.NS.2d Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats. I can convert a rational number to a decimal using long division.
CC.7.SP.1 Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population. Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences. I can explain how a sample of a population can be used to gain information about the entire population.
CC.7.SP.3 Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. Informally assess the degree of visual overlap of two numerical data distributions with similar variabilities, measuring the difference between the centers by expressing it as a multiple of a measure of variability. For example, the mean height of players on the basketball team is 10 cm greater than the mean height of players on the soccer team, about twice the variability (mean absolute deviation) on either team; on a dot plot, the separation between the two distributions of heights is noticeable. I can compare two numerical data distributions with similar variabilities by comparing their centers.
CC.7.SP.4 Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. Use measures of center and measures of variability for numerical data from random samples to draw informal comparative inferences about two populations. For example, decide whether the words in a chapter of a seventh-grade science book are generally longer than the words in a chapter of a fourth-grade science book. I can use measures of center of random samples to draw inferences comparing two populations.
CC.7.SP.5 Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models. Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A probability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an event that is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event. I can explain how the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1.
CC.7.SP.5   I can explain how the probability of a chance event indicates the likelihood of the event occurring.
CC.7.SP.5   I can explain what probabilities of 0, 1/2, and 1 represent.